Smokin at the Run, Miami, OK March 14, 15, &16

I would like to let everyone know about a contest that is striving to become a premier event for the region.    David Qualls and his team at the Buffalo Run Casino are working hard to turn this into a major event.  This event will kick off the barbecue season for the state of Oklahoma.  There are going to be three KCBS sanctioned events on the 15th and 16th.  There will be two 60 team contests going on simultaneously on Saturday, and another contest with unlimited teams on Sunday.  This contest could really grow into something special.  Let’s do our best to help them, and make sure that they have plenty of teams,  and judges.  Cook teams that are interested can download the entry form below.  The entry fee is $250 for one day or $400 for both days.  For those of you who would like to judge this unique contest can follow the link  http://www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx and fill out the online form.  Judges still needing signatures for their Master Judge can get two on this one weekend.  I attended this contest last year, and it was great.  It was well run, and had a really good location.  I will be attending both days this year so look for me, and come by and say hello.  I will post everything that David provided me below. I am really looking forward to this event, and seeing all of you there.

Miami ShootoutMiami Smokin

Entry Form

Smokin at the Run Combined Entry_2014

 

David Qualls’ Message to Teams

Hello Teams,
It’s Time for us to start planning the 2014 edition of Smokin at The Run!
March 14-16, 2014

This year’s contest is a double header with a twist!  The first contest is
the 1st annual Smokin’ At The Run Shootout. In a nutshell, we are taking up
to 120 teams and splitting you by a drawing at the cooks meeting into two
separate 60 team max contests to compete for a $10,000 purse.

The “Shootout” Portion of this contest is that the top score in each
category from the two contests (Flights A&B as sanctioned) will win the
Shootout for each category and receiver extra money and trophy.

The Top 5 Overall Total Points scoring  Teams will win additional Money and
Overall Shootout Trophy as well.  The total added Purse for Shootout Bonuses
will be $5000!

The payout schedule will pay to 10th place in each category as well as
overall and the minimum prize will be $100!

The Attached Entry Form Has the prize payout list included.

The Sunday Portion of the contest will be our 2nd Annual Smokin’ At The Run
Contest which will be open to all teams with no limit and will be a $10,000
purse paid out in the same manner as the Shootout flight prizes

A complete description of how the shootout will be formatted is included in
the attached entry as well .

Get your entries in early to secure your spot and you only need to send in a
deposit to secure your place. Please forward this to your BBQ Friends who
didn’t attend our contest this year as this email is only sent to teams that
entered this years contest.

We will also need 120 judges to make this a success and we will have a
online signup form available at www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx <http://www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx> as well as
team entries and information will be available at
www.buffalorun.com/smokin.aspx <http://www.buffalorun.com/smokin.aspx>

As a competitor myself, we wanted to make this a team friendly event and we
hope you choose to come and participate!

Thank You!

David Qualls

David’s Message to Judges

Hello All,

The online registration form for The Smokin’ At The Run Shootout weekend to
be held March 14-16, 2014

You May register to judge at the following web address;

www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx <http://www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx>

This year’s contest is a double header with a twist!  The first contest is
the 1st annual Smokin’ At The Run Shootout.

In a nutshell, we are taking up to 120 teams and splitting them by a drawing
at the cooks meeting into two separate 60 team max contests to compete for a
$10,000 purse.

The “Shootout” Portion of this contest is that the top score in each
category from the two contests (Flights A&B as sanctioned) will win the
Shootout for each category and receiver extra money and trophy.

The Top 5 Overall Total Points scoring  Teams will win additional Money and
Overall Shootout Trophy as well.  The total added Purse for Shootout Bonuses
will be $5000!

The Sunday Portion of the contest will be our 2nd Annual Smokin’ At The Run
Contest which will be open to all teams with no limit and will be a $10,000
purse paid out in the same manner as the Shootout flight prizes

We will  need 120 judges to make this a success and we will have a online
signup form available at www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx
<http://www.buffalorun.com/judges.aspx> as well as team
entries and information will be available at www.buffalorun.com/smokin.aspx
<http://www.buffalorun.com/smokin.aspx>

The KCBS Representatives for This Event will Be;

Dennis Polson
Linda Polson

Ralph Williams
Karen Jane Williams

Scott Grinstead
Steve Grinstead

I have also attached a copy of the team entry form for your information as
well.

Thank You for your consideration to participate as a Judge in this event
which could possibly be The Biggest BBQ Weekend In Oklahoma!

David Qualls

 

SMOKIN AT THE RUN SHOOTOUT INFORMATION

The Smokin At The Run Shootout, (The Shootout) will consist of two separate KCBS Sanctioned contests (Flights A & B), held simultaneously on the grounds of Buffalo Run Casino in Miami, Oklahoma.
The Purpose of this contest is two offer two separate contests of a Maximum of 60 teams and each flight will compete for its respective $10,000 purse and the “Shootout” Winners will share an additional $5,000 Shootout Prize Purse.
The Shootout winner is determined by the highest score of the team in each of the 4 meat categories of the Flights, as well as the top 5 highest overall scores of the Flights.
Example: Flight A Chicken 1st Place scores 178.8572 and Flight B Chicken 1st Place scores 179.4400, then Flight B wins the Shootout and the additional Prize Money. The same method applies to the top 5 highest overall scores between both flights.
All teams will enter the contest and a maximum of 120 teams will be accepted into The Shootout.
At The Mandatory Cooks Meeting all entered teams will have their name entered into a hopper and the selection of Flights will be determined by a live drawing. Flight A Will Be Identified as the Blue Turn-In, Flight B Will Be Identified as the Red Turn-In. Each Flight Selection will be alternately designated upon each draw of a team to ensure complete randomness of team drawn and Flight Assigned.
As Each Team is drawn and Flight Assigned, They will receive their Turn-in Boxes which will be numbered and have a Blue Or Red Marking Affixed to each container to designate which turn-in area assigned.
The Turn-In area of Red & Blue will be designated by Signs colored Red or Blue and the location will be announced at the Cooks Meeting as well. Team Spaces will not be separated by Flight which means you may be in Flight A and your neighbor may be in Flight B. The Turn-In area will be within the same proximity for each flight.
The Shootout will be treated as two separate contests which means there will be different sets of KCBS Rep’s, Judges, and Support Staff. We anticipate a large tent in the center of the contest area with Turn-In locations on opposite ends of the tent for the two Flights (Red & Blue). The Tent will be separated by a wall where the judges once assigned will not be allowed to commingle between the two contest judging areas.
In the unlikely event we have less than 80 teams enter, we will cancel one flight and add 100% of the Shootout Purse to the category winners and the top 5 overall Places.
Shootout Category Winner
Added Prize Money
Chicken………………………………..$600.00
Ribs………………………………………$600.00
Pork……………………………………..$600.00
Brisket………………………………….$600.00
Shootout Overall Winners
Added Prize Money
Grand Champion………………$1,000.00
Reserve………………………………..$600.00
3rd Overall……………………………$500.00
4th Overall……………………………$300.00
5th Overall……………………………$200.00

Smokin At The Run Shootout
Smokin At The Run Sunday
Contest Prize Payouts

Category                  Overall
1st Place………..$400.00…………….$1,000.00
2nd Place……….$300,00………………..$750.00
3rd Place………..$200,00………………..$500.00
4th Place………..$150.00………………..$300.00
5th Place………..$125.00………………..$250.00
6th Place………..$100.00………………..$100.00
7th Place………..$100.00………………..$100.00
8th Place………..$100.00………………..$100.00
9th Place………..$100.00………………..$100.00
10th Place……..$100.00………………..$100.00

Posted in Contests

Winter Vacation in Puerto Rico and a BBQ Contest

For those of you looking for somewhere to go this winter on vacation, but would like to go somewhere you could also compete or judge a barbecue contest, check out the invitation below:

 

Caribbean BBQ Association

“We do it low & slow in Puerto Rico”

www.BBQPR.com

 Yeeee haaaaaw! What could be better than starting of the 2014 BBQ season with a bad ass BBQ competition rolled into a winter vacation in Puerto Rico? NOTHING!

Attention all KCBS BBQ Judges & BBQ competitors.  The Caribbean BBQ Association (CBBQA) would like to invite you, your team, and the whole family to come to Puerto Rico and compete in the 7th Annual Cattlemen’s Caribbean BBQ competition on February 22nd & 23rd in San Juan. FYI it’s in the mid & upper 70’s here in February and the temperature of the ocean is nearly like bath water. We have beautiful beaches, great BBQ, and NO SNOW! We’re looking for competitors and KCBS BBQ Judges and we guarantee you will have a great time.

The Cattlemen’s Caribbean BBQ is a 2-day KCBS sanctioned BBQ competition held at the beautiful San Juan Convention Center.  This is the largest BBQ competition in the Caribbean Region and the culminating BBQ event for the region each year with 50 teams coming from around the region, the world, and the US to compete.

 

Note: The Sheraton Hotel Convention Center has a block of rooms dedicated to the Cattlemen’s BBQ but rooms are limited so book your reservations early.  Rooms completely sold out in 2011, 2012 and 2013 weeks before the contest.  When you call tell them you are with the Cattlemen’s BBQ Group when making your reservation, $189.00 / $199.00 a night. If you book too late they may have a room but it will be at a higher rate. The hotel is located at the San Juan Convention Center and the BBQ site the hotel are 10 minutes from the airport, 5 minutes from historic Old San Juan, and a 1 minute walk to the competition site. Restaurants, casino, and every amenity you can imagine are available plus 75 sunny degrees. Great deals on hotels located just minutes away from the site can be found on line if you have tight budget.

(787) 993-3500 or 1-866-932-7269 Sheraton Hotel Reservations.

We have personal to help you locate anything that you may need to purchase, or to find any local site you may want to visit. We’re just 5 minutes from Old San Juan, one of the most beautiful old world city’s on the planet, 500 years old, and the only rain forest in this hemisphere. There is more cool stuff to do here than you can shake a stick at.

We have a team registration form and a copy of the rules waiting for you. Just visit the CBBQA web site www.BBQPR.com and download a set today. The entry fee is $300.00 US and that covers both days. The registration fee also includes your 10 X 10 tent and booth space, 2 bags of natural lump charcoal, chicken thighs and wings, a brisket, 3 racks of ribs, a pork shoulder, burger buns, and ground beef for the hamburger challenge.

 

Contest schedule

 

“Ancillary Contests only”

Grand Champion/Reserve Grand Champion/ and 3rd Place cash and medals

Whole Hog/ Lechon Asado: Pig provided 80 pounds. May be cooked over charcoals, in a roaster, Caja China, smoker or other cooking device. Turn in times will be assigned to each team between 12 noon and 3 pm. When you are ready to have your pig judged notify the Head Judge and a team of judges will visit your booth and judge the pig whole and uncut. All Judges will sample and score the entry in your booth.

Buns Build a Better Burger (12:20-12:30)

Steak (1:20- 1:30)    

Frank’s Red Hot Wings of Fame (2:20-2:30)

Dessert  (3:20-3:30)  

Showmanship

Ancillary categories are all optional but all categories count towards the Saturday Grand Champion prizes and awards.

 

Sunday Slow Smoked Competition Categories & Turn in time for category

BBQ Sauce (11:00 to 11:10pm)

 Chicken: (12:00 to 12:10pm)

Pork Ribs: (1:00 to 1:10)

Pork Butt: (2:00 to 2:10)

Beef Brisket: (3:00 to 3:10pm)

Need a smoker and grill?

Option #1:

As we write this invitation we are negotiating with a national freight carrier for an ocean container to bring down your smokers. Check back with us before Christmas, but if this gets worked out you can deliver your smoker to the port in Florida where they will be loaded in our container and delivered to the competition site for you and then returned to Florida for you pick up the week following the contest.

 

 

Option #2.

We are massing a fleet of Weber 22.5” smokers just for our visitors from off of the Island. Weber Smokers 22.5”, Ugly Drum Smokers (UDS), and 55 Gal. SS drum grills are available to rent @ $100.00 US each, but in order to guarantee smokers for every team we need to have your team’s confirmation no later than January 6th 2014.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me anytime. My contact information is:

Mike@BBQPR.com or Bigmacjdbbq@yahoo.com        www.BBQPR.com     (787) 319-9410

Okay what are you waiting for? Book that flight and the rooms and confirm your team or your spot at the judges table. See in the dead of winter where the temp with the wind chill factor figures in is 75 degrees.

Kindest regards,

Michael A. Compton

Michael Compton

Pres. /Caribbean BBQ Association

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Cancelled Sep 20-21 Art of BBQ, Tulsa, OK

This event has been cancelled.  For more information please read the press release below”

 

August 20, 2013
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

To Whom It May Concern:

Blue Ox Dining Group and The Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa have decided to
pull out of the Kansas City Barbeque Society competition element of the 2013 Art
of BBQ. There will be a non-sanctioned event on October 12 instead of September
20-21, details of which are below.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Between unforeseen circumstances, new business ventures for Blue Ox and another
KCBS-sanctioned event being moved to the same weekend, it is our estimation that
the sanctioned KCBS competition side of this event will not be able to take place
to the high standards expected by our teams and judges. All teams will receive a
total refund of any entry fees paid for 2013. Pulling out of the KCBS competition
is not something either group takes lightly; however, we feel it is the best option.
Considering the costs related to KCBS certification as well as the circumstances
mentioned above, this event is positioned to lose money instead of being a fundraiser
for the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa.

In order to offer our teams an alternative, Blue Ox Dining Group will host a street
party on October 12, 2013 that includes a non-sanctioned, people’s choice cook-off.
All Art of BBQ teams are invited to participate free of charge and will receive
briskets to cook at no cost. The public will be able to participate in this event
with profits going to the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa.

The October 12 event will also include live music and a giant television screen
showing the Oklahoma vs. Texas football game. It is our goal to offer a less competition-oriented
event that is fun for participants and for the general public while also supporting
a worthy cause.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We value the work being done by KCBS and encourage teams and judges to participate
in other contests this fall. More information about sanctioned events can be found
at www.kcbs.us [http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001pDpUSYMy2MaHJ2_Yw3gM7lfUUApjGB4FoV10jOUlytIn0uCJJf23Qgktzf6v2xvT3IXgIsBgxql8itB_ye2_RG4SapnZQH9iHMJJ7lhFVPQ=].

Thank you for your continued support, and we hope you will join us October 12!

Sincerely,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Blake Ewing                           Ken Busby
Blue Ox Dining Group                    Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa

Posted in Contests

Wayne M. Schafer Pitmaster of Big Fat Daddy’s and organizer of the Hogging Up BBQ & Music Festival in Winchester Virginia

Wayne M. Schafer

Pitmaster of Big Fat Daddy’s

<http://www.bigfatdaddys.com/>

How and when did you get started in barbecue?
I started experimenting with barbecue while I was in high school. I wanted to come up with dry rubs for my meats, and grill them on wood fired grills, which at the time not many were in agreement with. They thought you would not be able to keep the meat from drying out, but I thought otherwise.
Where are you from?
Born and raised in Baltimore, MD I grew up in Towson and Rosedale.
What inspired you to get into barbecue, or what gives you inspiration now?
My inspiration was to create something different to eat at fairs and festivals. Back in the late 70′s sausage and cheesesteak and pizza was the norm. I wanted a juicy barbecue sandwich at a fair or festival or real beef sandwich, and it was not there–not like it is today. My inspiration? Just the fact you can experiment with different rubs, injections, spritzes, and it will come out different each time. I truly love cooking it, eating it, and of course I sell it as a profession. I want to say in Maryland, beef (as in pit beef) is more popular than pork. We have a real shortage of good Mom and Pop style BBQ joints to eat at because of this. It’s all commercial chains or nothing. It’s sort of like you must go to Virginia if you want to eat good pork.
What certifications, training, or special qualifications do you have?
I am a self taught chef who left high school to work in restaurants. I took Myron’s cooking class but not until 2012, after 30 years in business and I have to say, even an old dog like me learned some new tricks. I dream of the day I can compete, but for now, selling on weekends and at week long fairs is what I do.What kind of flavor profiles do you prefer, and what is prevalent in your area?
I hate to say it, but in Maryland it’s a sweet pork barbecue. My signature on the road is a sweet maple hickory with apple wood flavor with cajun slaw on top and it does very well. I myself prefer little to no sauce with a vinegar base North Carolina style at home or when I look for a place to eat. Since I travel to several states I am forced to change up my profiles sometimes if I am selling down in Southern Virginia versus New Jersey. I have to say no matter where I go I eat everyone’s bbq. I truly think you can have fifty people selling barbecue and they are all delicious and all different. That’s what makes it so great.
What is most appealing to you when it comes to presentation?
I’m a fanatic about it looking good and tasting good. I can’t stand barbecue stands that have unidentifiable shredded crap in a pan that looks dried up. What is that?
How spicy is too spicy?
For me, I love eating and trying different things. For the public, the consensus is not too spicy. I know a professional cook team that puts a zing into their pork. After it goes down it’s like a flavor burst in your mouth that you will never in a million years duplicate. I have never tasted anything so dynamite and I wish I could go somewhere and eat pork like that. However, for competition it seems to be a more muted desired taste and even they were forced to change up their flavor profile. (Make some for me, Hog It Up BBQ Team)
Dry or sauced(what is your preference)?
If you pork is moist enough and has been injected and cooked on flavored woods, sometimes you can get away with no sauce. I prefer lightly sauced.
Is there anything unique that is barbecued in your area?
In my hometown it’s not pork, it’s Maryland’s pit beef. That is Baltimore’s bbq. To heck with pork they will take a sliced beef sandwich anyday. Now in the part of Pennsylvania where I moved my business, it’s pork heaven. They call it pig picking. Everyone is grilling whole hogs or pigs on their grills each weekend. Friends up there religiously do this and like cannibals just pull the meat off the pig and shove it in their mouth. You really don’t get much yield but they love it. It’s like a religion up there.
What types of woods do you use? Are you a stick burner or pellet?
I am a stick burner! Hickory is my main wood, I also use apple, cherry and peach woods mixed with a good slow burning wood charcoal.
What kind of smoker do you use?
I use oil drums, barrels or open square pits. You could argue these may be called ‘grills’ and not smokers, but the way I designed them they get backflow of air and smoke. I make my own.

Would you like to share the types of rubs or injections you use?


My base rub has been published in the NY Times and you can use this as a base for rubbing just about anything. I sometimes add maple powder to it for ribs, or brown sugar to it for pork, etc. Add smoked paprika for a totally different flavor.

Here is the basic recipe :

2 tablespoons seasoned salt

1 tablespoon sweet paprika

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Do you have a favorite event?

I must plug Hogging Up BBQ & Music Festival in Winchester, Virginia (end of June.)

What do you consider your biggest accomplishments, and why?


The day in the late 90′s my now-wife served Steven Raichlen a beef sandwich from the tiny “roadside beef shack” my brother ran and the rest was history. Steven published Big Fat Daddy’s in his BBQ Books and in the New York Times. We landed in Saveur Magazine (taking us from roadside to gourmet category overnight.) This led to our constant success. The Baltimore Sun interviewed me for their “Iconic Foods” article and I seem to be some sort of authority on the dry rub and way to grill the perfect pit beef. In 2010 I was the pick for Maryland in the Rachael Ray Grilling Issue . I enjoyed catering two events for Ray Lewis, former Ravens linebacker. Because of this I have been very successful and it’s as of today, my company has been in 60 publications from radio stations to news, to magazines and papers. I have people that follow me from fair to fair just to eat my food and I can’t say enough about hometown spirit! That’s why I give back more now than ever. I believe in kharma!

Do you have a blog, YouTube channel, or webpage?

http://BigFatDaddys.blogspot.com and I also have a Tumblr blog http://BigFatDaddys.tumblr.com

My youtube channel and twitter account are both BigFatDaddys
Have you ever been featured on any television shows?
Not yet. Unless you count the news….truth be told a producer did call me to do show filming in Easton, MD but I didn’t do it. They wanted to watch exactly what I do for grilling my foods from start to finish. Your secrets aren’t worth the three minutes of TV glory.

Do you have a business, catering service, product line, or publication that you would like to tell our readers about?

I cater on weekends and do fairs and festivals primarily in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Virginia.

When did you start competing, and how did you first get involved in it?


I want to say I am a lifetime member of the KCBS but do not compete. Only as part of a condition of me selling pork at Bel Air BBQ Bash where I turn in something edible while trying to get my lunch menu ready. I have to say I dream of the day I can retire and spend weekends competing, but that day is not here yet. This year, 2013, we cooked on a tiny weber kettle for fun. We didn’t take it seriously and it showed. I have to commend those teams who are out there every weekend kicking it into overdrive and winning. It’s a lot harder than it looks!

When did you first start organizing contests, and how did you first get involved?

I organized the 2013 Hogging Up BBQ & Music Festival www.HoggingUp.com<http://www.hoggingup.com/> as a means to bring revenue to the tiny town of Winchester Virginia which is near and dear to my heart, and to have a celebration of my mother in law’s life. The first contest donated to Cancer Care in her memory but also supported three local Winchester non profits.
What goes in to organizing a contest?
More work than you can ever imagine. Nine months of planning for three days. The contest itself was the easy part, it’s every other part of the festival that you must organize in conjunction that’s hard. From the dumpsters to the grey water tanks, to the bands and marketing, it’s all on your plate.
How many volunteers does it take to run your contest?
The first year my family, friends, the church and the fire department helped out. We had about 20 on shifts over three days and certainly we could have used more!
What is the biggest challenge facing an organizer?
Making sure everything goes smoothly for your competitors and the patrons with no major issues. The weather as well can be so unkind.
Tell us about your venue?
We chose a small vintage style fairground off Route 11 in Clear Book, Virginia, called the Frederick County Fairgrounds (not to be confused with the one in Maryland…). It was old buildings and country style out of the way venue made it appealing for most. Most events are held at the bigger, newer fairgrounds down the road but I got my start at those fairground and wanted to bring something new to town. My hopes it to also bring people to that fairground each year. Right now they mainly have the county fair there, but it usually sits unused with the exception of a few smaller events.

How much does it cost to put on your contest?


Last year I put out well over $20grand out of my own pocket to line up bands, sound, fairgrounds, goodie bags, plaques, electrician and electrical modifications, advertising, marketing, etc. We had no major monetary sponsors but did recoup some investment off selling food and vendors. However, it makes it hard when our goal it to raise money for charity and the event costs you so much money to have.

Does your event support a cause?

We supported three local non profits and one national non profit. In all over $4000 was raised to benefit all of them.

What are some tips you could give to a new organizer?
Go to contests that are run smoothly and learn. We trained in Shelby, North Carolina and Jerry and Joyce Gardner are our mentors. You can’t learn enough. You must have community support and a good staff. Our contest is three hours from our home and work, and in a different state as our work or home and we did it successfully. That is only because we learned so much and asked the competitors, the organizers, the public for feedback on what they wanted in a contest.

Additionally, be in constant contact with the county you are dealing with. For us, we planned two years in advance and some county codes were defunct and we ended up spending three months in county hearings to get them changed just so we could have our contest. (An old code would have charged our vendors $500 per permit license, but after three months in county hearings it was reduced to $30). These are the unexpected stupid things you will encounter. You really need to do your homework or you will be spending valuable time fighting over a rule or code that can cost you time you should be spending on your contest. At the last minute we were told we had to get a camping permit to the state because the competitors left their trailers overnight. It was ridiculous. As well, we are private people putting on a contest. The non profits like the Chambers of Commerce who do it fare better with the county in our opinion.
What are some mistakes you see new organizers making?
We made the mistake of dropping thousands into popular bands that no one listened to. They were there for the barbecue. A little entertainment is nice but next year we will limit this to one band per night. As well the public wants a people’s choice. They made that loud and clear. You have to now find the happy medium between the health department, the competitors and the public which is not so easy until you find a system that works.

What would you like cook teams and/or judges to understand about organizing an event?

Some cook teams do wait until the deadline to apply which makes it hard for an organizer reworking their electrical plans. A master judge reamed out my wife because he wasn’t selected and here she was working 18 hour days to do something for the greater good. We received over 300 in the mail applications and goodness knows how many on email because the mail kept crashing (when our form said to send it in by the way.) It’s up the organizer how to pick and select their judges. In our case, we picked mostly out of towners to get revenue into the town to prove to the county we were doing this for them! We kept the locals for backup. I just wish judges wouldn’t take it so personal because you don’t know what tribulations the organizer is facing.

 

Posted in Interviews

Jelle Ver Berne – Smaakmakers BBQ Team, Olen, Belgium

Jelle Ver Berne

Smaakmakers

Olen, Belgium

www.smaakmakers.eu

 

How and when did you get started in barbecue?

Me and my father where interested in competing in the Belgian championship and we went to see the championship in 2007 to get a better idea.

From that moment we started to assembly our current team and we have been competing since 2008.

 

 Where are you from?

Olen, Belgium

 

What inspired you to get into barbecue, or what gives you inspiration now?

The fun and creativity that comes with creating great dishes and food from the grill.

 

What certifications, training, or special qualifications do you have?

Followed a KCBS judging training 3 years ago in Amsterdam.

 

What kind of flavor profiles do you prefer, and what is prevalent in your area?

I prefer the Mediterranean kitchen but i can enjoy pretty much any cuisine if it’s cooked right. Belgian cuisine is a mixture of classic French cuisine mixed with world flavors.

 

6. What is most appealing to you when it comes to presentation?

The creativity you can put into a dish when plated up, making it like a piece of art.

 

How spicy is too spicy?

I’d say from a mid-level to hot

 

Is there anything unique that is barbecued in your area?

Belgian bbq contest are different to the US contest in the way of we plate up our food on real plates instead of the turn-in boxes. We can use all garnishes, side dishes or sauces we see fit.

 

What types of woods do you use? Are you a stick burner or pellet?

I use alot of applewood or just plain oak.

 

What kind of smoker do you use?

We are big supporters of Primo Grill.

 

Do you have a favorite event?

Belgian national championship and The Jack

 

What do you consider your biggest accomplishments, and why?

Qualifying for the Jack this year and winning the Public choice award at the world championship in 2008 and the Belgian championship in 2010.

 

Do you have a blog, YouTube channel, or webpage?

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smaakmakers1

and our website: www.smaakmakers.eu

 

Have you ever been featured on any television shows?

Made some recipes for local tv and several brands.

 

Do you have a business, catering service, product line, or publication that you would like to tell our readers about?

Me and my father own a catering company, we do more then just barbecue but bbq is the thing we do most.

 

Are there any tips, techniques, or recipes that you feel comfortable sharing with our readers?

Enjoy…

 

Have you ever had an epic failure (e. g. fire went out, forgot something at home, power goes out at your contest, extreme weather, etc.) at a contest?

We forgot a glaze for our ribs at home 2 years ago, one day before the championship started at 23:00 we noticed it and called home.Called one of the staff and he managed to get it to us in time (Belgium isn’t that big )

 

Do you have a funny story you would like to share?

U should go eat Chinese food after every competition.

We did it last time and had a blast even if u consider the food wasn’t good at all.

 

When did you start competing, and how did you first get involved in it?

Started in 2008 after visiting the Belgian championship in 2007. Hooked ever since.

 

What is your biggest win?

Public choice award world championship 2008

 

Where did you get your first win?

World championship 2008

 

How many Reserve and Grand Championships do you have?

One time grand champion at a regional championship

 

How has becoming a professional or semi-professional barbecue cook changed your life? Are you full time, or do you hope to be in the near future?

It has changed my life alot, Looks like i breath, walk and talk barbecue as it’s a big part of my life.

 

 Do you compete locally, or do you travel all over to compete?

Regional and we do foreign competitions normally once a year.

 

What are some tips you could give to a new cook team?

Make sure u get a good crew of friends, without the friendship it’s hard to keep a good team together.

 

 How much does it cost to compete in a contest (e. g. meat costs, gas, entry fees, etc.)?

Never counted all the costs together but i’d say the try-outs cost more then the costs u have on site. Our team comes together each 2 weeks to cook and or brainstorm about new things or to improve out existing recipes.

 

 What do you consider the most frustrating part of competition barbecue?

The part that sometimes the quality of the judges is up for discussion. Unlike in the US we in Belgium or Europa for that mather lack trained judges.

 

Posted in Interviews

Ben Bartlett – President British BBQ Association, Chef, Author, BBQ Enthusiast

Ben Bartlett

 

Captain Best of British BBQ Team

President British BBQ Association

 

Websites:

www.bbqben.co.uk

www.bbqa.co.uk

www.britishbbqteam.co.uk

Twitter: @bbqben1

LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/ben-bartlett/7/667/215

 

My new book “The BBQ Manual” is now available. Signed copies available exclusively at http://www.bbqa.co.uk/ and on Amazon

The World Barbecue Championships in Morroco

You were recently a judge at the WBC in Morroce, can you please tell us about your experience there.

It turned out to be a great championship with lots of music, dancing people, tremendous nice looking plates of food, enormous audiences, great atmosphere and lots of smoke with great flavours.

How did you get selected to judge this contest?

I was asked by the WBQA to be one of the Head Judges

Can you tell us how many teams compete in this contest?

Over 40 countries competed from as far afield as Australia and Argentina

How many judges are used?

There were 90 International judges from all over the world

Can you tell us about the venue, and accommodations?

The event was held in the town square of Saidia, in the north-west of Morocco

What categories are judged?

Lamb ribs with bread garnish, chicken with tomato side, lamb shoulder with corn, beef brisket with potato side, “freestyle” dessert (60% has

to be cooked on the bbq), sauce and team stand

How are entries submitted?

Two judges visit each stand and the rest are blind judged.  Proper white china plates are provided.

What scoring system do they use, and how are entries judged (e. g. comparison, or on their own merits)?

Judges award marks for taste, texture, appearance and team stand

Is the barbecue like that we see in America, or is different depending on the country?

Yes it does vary. We could not judge Pork for religious reasons so we had Lamb instead. Also the style varies from country to country with Moroccan men in long white dresses turning the meat on a spit for 3 hours

whereas the Argentinian team cook “asado”, literally throwing charcoal or wood

on the floor and putting the meat on cross skewers and hanging this over the

fire and turning it and dousing it with a secret liquid regularly.

Is there anything else you would like to tell our readers about your experience?

The WBQA logo is “Make people happy, let’s barbecue & make friends around the world”.

 General Questions

How and when did you get started in barbecue?

I barbecued at a friend’s wedding reception 10 years ago and the numbers kept going up and up each week. On the day there were nearly 100 guests and I had 3 bbqs going at once!

Where are you from?

Bristol, United Kingdom

What inspired you to get into barbecue, or what gives you inspiration now?

I love the theatre of bbq and cooking for family and friends

What certifications, training, or special qualifications do you have?

I am a certified judge for KCBS, WBQA and BBQA

What kind of flavor profiles do you prefer, and what is prevalent in your area?

I like many American styles of BBQ and Mediterranean cuisine

What is most appealing to you when it comes to presentation?

Colourful, appetising, moist and succulent foods

How spicy is too spicy?

Mild to medium for me

Dry or sauced(what is your preference)?

It depends on the dish. For me ribs must have sauce, but a tandoori chicken is best dry

Is there anything unique that is barbecued in your area?

No, all meats, fish, vegetables and fruit. Though British people tend to grill more than smoke.

What types of woods do you use? Are you a stick burner or pellet?

I like fruit woods and use a lot of oak. British people don’t like it too mesquite or hickory

What kind of smoker do you use?

I have several in different shapes and sizes

Would you like to share the types of rubs or injections you use?

My rubs are top secret but I like using 100% Hungarian paprika either spicy or sweet that gives a fantastic colour to meats

Do you have a favorite event?

Probably the “Jack”

What do you consider your biggest accomplishments, and why?

I was the first winner of Britain’s Best BBQer awarded by the British BBQ Association and also won the “I know Jack…about Grillin” category at the Jack Daniels World BBQ Championships in Tennessee

Do you have a blog, YouTube channel, or webpage?

Yes www.bbqben.com, twitter bbqben1 and I am on Facebook

Have you ever been featured on any television shows?

Yes Good Morning America, Ready Steady Cook and Sun, Sea & Bargain Spotting

Do you have a business, catering service, product line, or publication that you would like to tell our readers about?

I have written the Haynes BBQ Manual

Are there any tips, techniques, or recipes that you feel comfortable sharing with our readers?

Yes please buy my book!

Have you ever had an epic failure (e. g. fire went out, forgot something at home, power goes out at your contest, extreme weather, etc.) at a contest?

No but we have competed in howling rain and at high altitude

Do you have a funny story you would like to share?

Mathew and Viv from my team “The Best of British BBQ Team” are always playing practical jokes and once tied me with tape to a tree!

Judging

 When did you decide to start judging, and how did you get into judging?

After competing for a few years, I wanted to see the other side of the story!

Tell us about your experience being a judge.

I enjoy meeting other judges and trying different flavours

What is your favorite category to judge? Can you tell us about the best thing you ever ate at a competition?

I love pulled pork and had the best at the American Royal

 What is the worst thing that you have ever had to judge?

Either rattlesnake or eel

How long have you been judging and how many contests have you judged?

I have been judging 8 years and judged about 50 contests

Do you judge locally, or do you travel all over to contests?

I judge in the UK, America and for the World BBQ Association

What are some tips you could give to a new judge?

Be open minded and don’t judge over critically because a dish may not be to your personal taste

What are some mistakes you see new Judges making?

Asking unnecessary questions that are in the rules

What improvement do you think could be made in the judging process?

Not eliminating the highest and lowest scores

Do you have experience in different scoring systems (e. g. KCBS, Memphis in May, Lonestar, etc.)? If so, what are the pluses and minuses of each system? How would you improve a system?

Generally they all work well providing there are enough experienced judges

What do you think about the use of greenery in boxes? Does it make a difference, or would you like to see just the meat?

The greenery can help the appearance

What do you consider the most frustrating part of judging?

Waiting for the food!

What do you wish that organizers would do a better job at?

Putting the results quickly onto the internet

Cooking

When did you start competing, and how did you first get involved in it?

My first contest was in 2003 at the American Royal and was a prize for winning Britain’s Best BBQer

What is your biggest win?

The “I know Jack…about Grillin” category at the Jack Daniels World BBQ Championships in Tennessee

Where did you get your first win?

Morning Advertiser Al Fresco Dining Awards

How many Reserve and Grand Championships do you have?

Four

How has becoming a professional or semi-professional barbecue cook changed your life? Are you full time, or do you hope to be in the near future?

I am now President of the British BBQ Association and give talks and demonstrations at food festivals and shows all over the world

Do you compete locally, or do you travel all over to compete?

We travel internationally to compete and have entered contests all over America, Canada and Europe

What are some tips you could give to a new cook team?

Speak to seasoned BBQers

What are some mistakes you see new cook teams making?

Not maintaining a consistent pit temperature and letting food get cold

How much does it cost to compete in a contest (e. g. meat costs, gas, entry fees, etc.)?

For us the big expense is the flights. Many of the contest organisers help us borrow pits and equipment

What do you consider the most frustrating part of competition barbecue?

Not knowing why a judge awards a 6 when all the others give you a 9!

11.What would you like to tell organizers, or judges?

Thanks for your hard work!

 

Organizing

 

 When did you first start organizing contests, and how did you first get involved?

After winning Britain’s Best BBQer two years in a row, the organizers asked me to judge the following year

What goes in to organizing a contest?

It takes months of planning and works well with a calendar of actions

How many volunteers does it take to run your contest?

A few key organisers and another 6+ volunteers depending on the size of the contest

What is the biggest challenge facing an organizer?

The weather

Tell us about your venue?

Various hotels, pubs and golf courses across the UK

How much does it cost to put on your contest?

Organising costs are a few thousand pounds and then the prizes on top

What is the history of your contest

I organise/judge at several contests

Does your event support a cause?

Yes we always support a local charity in the area

What are some tips you could give to a new organizer?

Establish volunteers with different skills you can utilize

What are some mistakes you see new organizers making?

Spending too much money on advertising

What would you like cook teams and/or judges to understand about organizing an event?

Its hard work but rewarding!

 

 

 

 

Ben Bartlett

Captain Best of British BBQ Team

President British BBQ Association

Websites:

www.bbqben.co.uk

www.bbqa.co.uk

www.britishbbqteam.co.uk

How and when did you get started in barbecue?

I barbecued at a friend’s wedding reception 10 years ago and the numbers kept going up and up each week. On the day there were nearly 100 guests and I had 3 bbqs going at once!

Where are you from?

Bristol, United Kingdom

What inspired you to get into barbecue, or what gives you inspiration now?

I love the theatre of bbq and cooking for family and friends

What certifications, training, or special qualifications do you have?

I am a certified judge for KCBS, WBQA and BBQA

What kind of flavor profiles do you prefer, and what is prevalent in your area?

I like many American styles of BBQ and Mediterranean cuisine

What is most appealing to you when it comes to presentation?

Colourful, appetising, moist and succulent foods

How spicy is too spicy?

Mild to medium for me

Dry or sauced(what is your preference)?

It depends on the dish. For me ribs must have sauce, but a tandoori chicken is best dry

Is there anything unique that is barbecued in your area?

No, all meats, fish, vegetables and fruit. Though British people tend to grill more than smoke.

What types of woods do you use? Are you a stick burner or pellet?

I like fruit woods and use a lot of oak.  British people don’t like it too mesquite or hickory

What kind of smoker do you use?

I have several in different shapes and sizes

Would you like to share the types of rubs or injections you use?

My rubs are top secret but I like using 100% Hungarian paprika either spicy or sweet that gives a fantastic colour to meats

Do you have a favorite event?

Probably the “Jack”

What do you consider your biggest accomplishments, and why?

I was the first winner of Britain’s Best BBQer awarded by the British BBQ Association and also won the “I know Jack…about Grillin” category at the Jack Daniels World BBQ Championships in Tennessee

Do you have a blog, YouTube channel, or webpage?

Yes www.bbqben.com, twitter bbqben1 and I am on Facebook

Have you ever been featured on any television shows?

Yes Good Morning America, Ready Steady Cook and Sun, Sea & Bargain Spotting

Do you have a business, catering service, product line, or publication that you would like to tell our readers about?

I have written the Haynes BBQ Manual

Are there any tips, techniques, or recipes that you feel comfortable sharing with our readers?

Yes please buy my book!

19.  Have you ever had an epic failure (e. g. fire went out, forgot something at home, power goes out at your contest, extreme weather, etc.) at a contest?

No but we have competed in howling rain and at high altitude

20.  Do you have a funny story you would like to share?

Mathew and Viv from my team “The Best of British BBQ Team” are always playing practical jokes and once tied me with tape to a tree!

Judging

21.  When did you decide to start judging, and how did you get into judging?

After competing for a few years, I wanted to see the other

side of the story!

22. Tell us about your experience being a judge.

I enjoy meeting other judges and trying different flavours

23.  What is your favorite category to judge? Can you tell us about the best thing you ever ate at a competition?

I love pulled pork and had the best at the American Royal

24.  What is the worst thing that you have ever had to judge?

Either rattlesnake or eel

25.  How long have you been judging and how many contests have you judged?

I have been judging 8 years and judged about 50 contests

26.  Do you judge locally, or do you travel all over to contests?

I judge in the UK, America and for the World BBQ Association

27.  What are some tips you could give to a new judge?

Be open minded and don’t judge over critically because a dish may not be to your personal taste

28.  What are some mistakes you see new Judges making?

Asking unnecessary questions that are in the rules

29.  What improvement do you think could be made in the judging process?

Not eliminating the highest and lowest scores

30.  Do you have experience in different scoring systems (e. g. KCBS, Memphis in May, Lonestar, etc.)? If so, what are the pluses and minuses of each system? How would you improve a system?

Generally they all work well providing there are enough experienced

judges

11.What do you think about the use of greenery in

boxes? Does it make a difference, or

would you like to see just the meat?

The greenery can help the appearance

12.What do you consider the most frustrating part of

judging?

Waiting for the food!

13.What do you wish that organizers would do a better job

at?

Putting the results quickly onto the internet

14.Is there anything you would like to tell to cook teams?

Cooking

1. When did you start competing, and how did you first get

involved in it?

My first contest was in 2003 at the American Royal and was a

prize for winning Britain’s Best BBQer

2.What is your biggest win?

The “I know Jack…about Grillin” category at the Jack Daniels

World BBQ Championships in Tennessee

3.Where did you get your first win?

Morning Advertiser Al Fresco Dining Awards

4.How many Reserve and Grand Championships do you have?

Four

5.How has becoming a professional or semi-professional

barbecue cook changed your life? Are you

full time, or do you hope to be in the near future?

I am now President of the British BBQ Association and give

talks and demonstrations at food festivals and shows all over the world

6.Do you compete locally, or do you travel all over to

compete?

We travel internationally to compete and have entered

contests all over America, Canada and Europe

7.What are some tips you could give to a new cook team?

Speak to seasoned BBQers

8.What are some mistakes you see new cook teams making?

Not maintaining a consistent pit temperature and letting

food get cold

9.How much does it cost to compete in a contest (e. g. meat

costs, gas, entry fees, etc.)?

For us the big expense is the flights. Many of the contest

organisers help us borrow pits and equipment

10.What do you consider the most frustrating part of

competition barbecue?

Not knowing why a judge awards a 6 when all the others give

you a 9!

11.What would you like to tell organizers, or judges?

Thanks for your hard work!

Organizing

1. When did you first start organizing contests, and how did

you first get involved?

After winning Britain’s Best BBQer two years in a row, the

organisers asked me to judge the following year

2.What goes in to organizing a contest?

It takes months of planning and works well with a calendar

of actions

3.How many volunteers does it take to run your contest?

A few key organisers and another 6+ volunteers depending on

the size of the contest

4.What is the biggest challenge facing an organizer?

The weather

5.Tell us about your venue?

Various hotels, pubs and golf courses across the UK

6.How much does it cost to put on your contest?

Organising costs are a few thousand pounds and then the

prizes on top

7.What is the history of your contest?

I organise/judge at several contests

8.Does your event support a cause?

Yes we always support a local charity in the area

9.What are some tips you could give to a new organizer?

Establish volunteers with different skills you can utilize

10.What are some mistakes you see new organizers making?

Spending too much money on advertising

11.What would you like cook teams and/or judges to

understand about organizing an event?

Its hard work but rewarding!

World Barbecue Championship

1.Tell us about the World Barbecue Championship in Morocco?

It turned out to

be a great championship with lots of music, dancing people, tremendous nice

looking plates of food, enormous audiences, great atmosphere and lots of smoke

with great flavours.

2.How did you get selected to judge this contest?

I was asked by the WBQA to be one of the Head Judges

3.Can you tell us how many teams compete in this contest?

Over 40 countries competed from as far afield as Australia

and Argentina

4.How many judges are used?

There were 90 International judges from all over the world

5.Can you tell us about the venue, and accommodations?

The event was held in the town square of Saidia, in the

north-west of Morocco

6.What categories are judged?

Lamb ribs with bread garnish, chicken with tomato side, lamb

shoulder with corn, beef brisket with potato side, “freestyle” dessert (60% has

to be cooked on the bbq), sauce and team stand

7.How are entries submitted?

Two judges visit each stand and the rest are blind judged.

Proper white china plates are provided.

8.What scoring system do they use, and how are entries

judged (e. g. comparison, or on their own merits)?

Judges award marks for taste, texture, appearance and team

stand

9.Is the barbecue like that we see in America, or is

different depending on the country?

Yes it does vary. We could not judge Pork for religious

reasons so we had Lamb instead. Also the style varies from country to country

with Moroccan men in long white dresses turning the meat on a spit for 3 hours

whereas the Argentinian team cook “asado”, literally throwing charcoal or wood

on the floor and putting the meat on cross skewers and hanging this over the

fire and turning it and dousing it with a secret liquid regularly.

10.Are there any special categories, not usually judged in

normal competitions?

11.Is there anything else you would like to tell our readers

about your experience?

The WBQA logo is “Make people happy, let’s barbecue &

make friends around the world”.

Regards,

Ben

Ben Bartlett

Captain Best of British BBQ Team

President British BBQ Association

Cell: +44 7941222745

Fax: +44 8701316031

Address: 167 Wordsworth Road, Bristol. BS7 0EQ. UK

Email: benjaminbartlett@yahoo.co.uk

Websites:

www.bbqben.co.uk

www.bbqa.co.uk

www.britishbbqteam.co.uk

Twitter: @bbqben1

LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/ben-bartlett/7/667/215

My new book “The BBQ Manual” is now available. Signed copies available exclusively at http://www.bbqa.co.uk/ and on Amazon

Posted in Interviews

Judging Professionalism

I have been asked to write a post on judging professionalism.  Recently a cook team witnessed some questionable behavior by a judge, and brought it up on Facebook.  In their own words, “Yesterday at a BBQ contest during the brisket judging a judge was observed holding up a slice of brisket swinging it back and forth like a dinner bell. Is this the new way to test for tenderness?”  This Facebook posting quickly received dozens of responses condemning this judges’ actions, and questioning the professionalism of judges in general.  It was quickly followed by responses by judges defending the majority of judges while apologizing for this judges’ actions.  Many cook teams also commented that they appreciate the judges, and believe that most conduct themselves in a professional manner.

I am not sure what this judge was trying to accomplish.  I don’t know of any reason why you would swing a piece of brisket back, and forth like a dinner bell.  The thing that they forgot is that although we are in our own little judging area, there are many eyes on us.  Cook teams spend hundreds of dollars, and spend many hours preparing their entries.  Even the best teams have off days, and new teams are learning the ropes.  Out of respect for them we should provide them with professional judges.  I am not saying that judges should not be able to have fun.  If it wasn’t fun why would anyone want to do it?  Of course you can still have fun without looking disrespectful.

I asked Ralph Williams a respected KCBS Contest Representative to weigh in on this matter:

“We enjoy seeing judges on Saturday who are excited to be on site and willing to work with all of the “stuff” that may have happened that they are not aware happened and still want to have “FUN.”  Secondly we enjoy those judges who, when time for judging, show the
professionalism they were taught in their initial training class and still have FUN !!

What we DO NOT LIKE are the stories that are told of things that happen during judging that in most cases could have happened to anyone. The person you talk about may on the other hand be talking about you and something they may or may not know is factual All of this makes a cook wonder why should they invest their time and money for what they “hear” is happening.

Cooks have many reasons for wanting to travel and cook as they do. They enjoy cooking and winning prize money the same as a professional fisherman. As cooks they provide a judge an opportunity to come together as a group for fellowship, enjoy judging great BBQ and even taking some home with them On the other hand all they ask is the judging be done in the professional manor they were taught. Judges scores are critical to cooks. A judge and their scoring help determine the awarding of thousands upon thousands of dollars on any given weekend. All the cook asks is: be consistent, be fair by only judging what is presented and not what you the individual expects, and follow the judging guidelines as presented by KCBS at EACH contest.

HAPPY BBQing hope to see you soon.”

I know that the majority of our judges conduct themselves in a professional manner.  It only takes one unprofessional act to bring in to question the entire judging corps.  Remember the eyes of an entire contest are upon us.  We are the ones that determine the outcome, and to some their livelihood.  We also want to make sure that we don’t turn off new teams that are just starting out.  If you are the table captain, or judge at a table and see something that might reflect badly upon us say something.  I don’t think that we need to institute draconian measures, just a simple suggestion should suffice.  Just let the person know that people are watching, and it might make them question whether we are taking our responsibilities seriously.  Remember I am not saying to take all the fun out of judging, just keep it professional.

 

 

 

 

Posted in BBQ Brett's Posts

Check out all the New Features of BBQJudges.org

I have recently changed the web building software on the site.  The new site is much more user friendly, and allows users much more freedom in adding their information and getting it out to the members.

Classifieds
We have a new free classifieds section that allows you to post your own ads.  It is a searchable database that will allow members to search by product, city, state, or any other criteria they wish.  If you have rubs, sauces, equipment, catering service, restaurant, or anything else you would like to promote place your ad here http://www.bbqjudges.org/classifieds/.
Ads

If you would like to have more attention to your product that just a classified ad we have main page banners, and sidebar banners for sale.  Main banners will be placed in a rotating banner program allowing your banner to be seen on multiple pages.  These banners will be at the top of the page with a maximum size of 1000 X 250.  These banners run $30 a month.  If you would like to spend a little less we have sidebar banners that run down the side of the webpages.  This is also a rotating banner program with two sections on each page.  These banners have a maximum size of 250 X 250 with a cost of $15 a month.  If you are interested in placing an ad follow this link for more information http://www.bbqjudges.org/advertising-ratespurchase/.
Events and Classes

We also have a new calendar that you can post your events or classes on.  If you have a cooking class, or help to run an event place it on this calendar.  Members can click on the date, and see everything that is going on in the world on that date.  Follow this link to the calendar http://www.bbqjudges.org/eventsandclasses/.
Forums
 

We also have new forums.  The new forums allow you to post your own threads, and subscribe to them to get emails when someone responds.  They are open for any discussions.  We have brought together the Judges, Organizers, and Cook teams into one area to facilitate the information between the groups.  To get to the forums follow this link:  http://www.bbqjudges.org/forums/
Posted in BBQ Brett's Posts

Not even tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, and torrential rain can dampen the passion for BBQ

This has been a rough two weeks for the people of Oklahoma.  The first major event that occurred was the tornado that struck the city of Moore.  By now everyone has viewed the devastation that resulted from this massive storm.  Within minutes of the newscasts I began getting messages from the people of Operation Barbecue Relief that they were swinging into action, and were headed to Moore to help the victims and first responders.  The last report that I saw was that during their stay in the Moore area Operation BBQ Relief served around 143,000 meals.  I would like to commend them on the effort, and the support they have given to the people of Oklahoma.  If you would like to make a contribution to this fine charity, or offer your services for the next emergency visit their website at http://www.operationbbqrelief.org/.

While the recovery of Moore was ongoing, Oklahoma was once again struck by severe weather.  On the 30th of May another tornado struck the town of Broken Arrow.  The next night multiple tornadoes struck the state, and at last count the death toll stood at 16 people.  The same storm that spawned the tornadoes, dumped almost eight inches of rain over many counties in the state.  Due to this torrential downpour, many areas were hit with flash floods.

In the middle of all this chaos was a BBQ competition in the town of Okemah.  The Okfuskee Volunteer Firefighters Wildfire Cookoff is a second year contest that is held to raise money for the volunteer firefighters.  The morning of the contest I received a call from Jamie Griffin.  She was concerned that due to the widespread storm damage, and flooding she would not have enough judges to hold her contest.  On the way to the contest we passed many areas that were under water.  Okfuskee county received almost 8 inches of rain in three day.  After arriving at the contest I noticed that there were not a lot of judges in the tent.  Within 30 minutes of my arrival, the tent was full of judges.

This contest is also ran by the firefighters.  We were informed that not only did the firefighter work all night running the contest; they spent the night saving the lives of  many people caught in the flood waters.  They also let us know that even though a major storm had hit the contest site, only one of the 28 teams had to withdraw because they were unable to keep their fire going.  As the contest went on, you could feel the sense of community of the organizers, judges, and cook teams coming together for this worthy cause.  The contest went off without a hitch, and as the day progressed the clouds blew away and the sun came out.  It was reassuring to see that no matter what each person had been through, we could come together for our love of BBQ, and forget about the problems we had at home for a few hours.

 

 

 

Posted in BBQ Brett's Posts

Butcher BBQ on BBQ Pitmasters

If you haven’t seen the season opener of BBQ Pitmasters on Destination America stop reading this post. If you have, you were able to see Butcher BBQ (our site sponsor) take on The Rolling Grill, and Big Jim’s BBQ. David and Martin Bouska did an excellent job of representing our home state. They were able to show the professionalism, and high level of excellence of Oklahoma BBQ.

They were faced with two excellent cook teams in The Rolling Grill, and Big Jim’s BBQ. Both of these teams submitted boxes in both categories that could have easily won a competition. I think where David was able to set himself above these worthy competitors was in his knowledge as a butcher. His pork box was masterfully done. As a Master Judge, I know when I see a box filled with pieces from different areas of the pork butt that this is a cook that knows what he is doing.

I would like to congratulate David and Martin on their win. I want to wish them good luck in the Regional semifinal, I know they will do well. I look forward to seeing the next round, as well as the upcoming BBQ Pitmasters to see who will be there competition.

If you have never used any of their product I highly recommend them. You can check on this blog, and you will find several reviews. You can find there banner on top of our site pages, and also in the partners section of the links page.

Posted in BBQ Brett's Posts

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